Search Blog
  • Alan Fustey
  • Becky Wong
  • Bert Griffin
  • Blair MacDougall
  • Blake Goldring
  • Brett Baughman
  • Camillo Lento
  • Chris Delaney
  • Cynthia Kett
  • Darren Long
  • Desmond Jordan
  • Don Shaughnessy
  • Doug Lamb
  • Ed Olkovich
  • Eva Sachs
  • Evelyn Jacks
  • Gail Bebee
  • Gerald Trites
  • Gordon Brock
  • Guy Conger
  • Guy Ward
  • Heather Phillips
  • Ian Burns
  • Ian R. Whiting
  • Ian Telfer
  • Jack Comeau
  • James Dean
  • James West
  • Jeffrey Lipton Fairmont Gloucester
  • Jim Ruta
  • Jim Yih
  • Joe White
  • Jonathan Chevreau
  • Kenneth Eng
  • Larry Weltman
  • Malvin Spooner
  • Mark Borkowski
  • Marty Gunderson
  • Michael Kavanagh
  • Monty Loree
  • Nick Papapanos
  • Norma Walton
  • Pat Bolland
  • Patrick O’Meara
  • Paul Brent
  • Peter Deeb
  • Peter Lantos
  • Riaz Mamdani
  • Richard Crenian
  • Richard Warke
  • Rick Atkinson
  • Rob Peers
  • Robert Bird
  • Robert Gignac
  • Sam Albanese
  • Stephane Ruah
  • Steve Nyvik
  • Steve Selengut
  • Tammy Johnston
  • Terry Cutler
  • Trade With Kavan
  • Trevor Parry
  • Trindent Consulting
  • Wayne Wile
  • Categories
    January 2013
    M T W T F S S
    « Dec   Feb »


    Is household debt a threat to our economy?

    Guy Ward

    Here are the facts:

    1.Canadian household debt is indeed equal to 154% of disposable income… 2.The housing market is softening and prices are going down in many areas of
    the country… 3.Canadians will be impacted by higher interest rates…

    Even given these facts; it’s unlikely that Canada will experience a financial crisis. Household debt has been increasing steadily over that past 30 years as interest
    rates continue to decline but, for the most part, Canadians gear their borrowing to what they can afford. Jobs are holding steady and business is confident about
    future prospects. So, lower interest rates mean less money goes to servicing debts.

    In accumulating debt, Canadians also have a large asset, namely their homes. And although some in the financial community are concerned about the
    massive debt, Eric Lascelles, chief economist at RBC Global Asset Management recently said that assets outweigh debt by a factor of five.
    It’s true that high household debt does put homeowners at risk but a closer look at the stats tells a better story. Overall Canadians exercise fairly good
    judgment when it comes to borrowing. The more vulnerable – seniors and lowincome earners — carry lower debt loads. It’s also true that the housing market
    carries a big part of household debt, however the percentage of income earmarked for mortgage payments is not burdensome.
    The new mortgage rules will certainly have an impact on the housing industry as will declining house prices; and interest rates will rise. Perhaps this will lead
    to some weakening of the economy. Delinquencies might increase a bit but the risk of the economy going into a recession is low. High-ratio mortgages are
    insured and our sub-prime market is small.

    As for the weaker growth, Flaherty has said that the government could increase its deficit to shore up the economy. “If we ran into a serious world economic crisis arising out of the European situation, or something else, “he said, “Then of course we’d be responsive if we had to be to protect the Canadian economy and protect Canadian jobs as we have done in the past.”

    Guy Ward is a Mortgage Broker in Calgary, Alberta with TMG (The Mortgage Group Alberta).


    The MONEY® Network