Dying isn’t free (no good deed goes unpunished!)

I know this sounds a bit irreverent or flippant however it is meant to stimulate some hard thinking about the real costs of dying. Sure, there are lots of lists around, but I haven’t found 1 yet that covers everything I have seen in nearly 43-years in this industry. Is this list perfect? Absolutely not – but it will get you thinking about your own and your family’s situation. Remember, not all of these will apply to you – but some will – and the costs range widely.

* Probate Fees * Legal Fees * Copying and certifying fees * Paid searches for titles, etc. * Legal notifications to family * Legal notifications to creditors * Asset Transfer fees * Estate Accounting Fees * Terminal Tax Return Fees * Estate Tax Return Fees * Rights and Things Tax Return Fees * Ongoing Tax Return Fees if estate not settled within 12 months * Testamentary Trust Tax Return Fees *Preparing and filing tax election fees (estate and personal) * Executor and Trustee Fees (annually until Estate and all trusts closed) * Executor and Trustee disbursements – copying, telephone, faxing, certifications, mileage, parking, travel expenses * Valuation fees – real estate, listed personal property, personal property, real estate and other capital and/or depreciable property * Transfer costs for title transfer to Executor and/or Trustee and eventually to residual beneficiaries * Commissions paid for asset sales – real estate, estate sales, sale of listed personal assets, if necessary * Commissions paid to investment advisors for selling stocks and bonds not held in managed-money accounts *Income taxes payable – terminal tax return, estate tax return(s), Rights and Things tax return, Trust tax return(s) * Tax due on transfer of pensions and registered assets to other than spouse * Shrinkage of realisable asset value due to urgency of sale – tax paid on FMV not $ received – must replace lost $ * Account closing fees on nominee accounts and self-directed investment accounts
* Court fees – Probate and other as necessary if Will contested * Court costs if you die intestate * Banking Fees – estate bank accounts, trust bank accounts * Rental Fees – safety deposit box or other secure location *Funeral, memorial and related costs – cultural, faith-based, community or family expectations. Wake or similar * Costs of collecting promissory notes owed to deceased – loans to family members and businesses * Terminal care costs not covered by Government, group or personal plans * Legal costs to defend Will from challenges * Payment of all legally enforceable debts – including ones you guaranteed or co-signed * Perpetual pet care * Costs of care for children and other dependents (maybe your parents!) * Cost to close your social media accounts * Payment for ongoing business management until it is sold * Short-term emergency funds for survivors * Ongoing income for survivors including education costs * Cash Bequests * Murphy is alive and well – expect a visit along with family discord! * Your guess: ______________________________

I can promise a few things about this list: a) your estate will have at least one cost not included here; b) you will be very unpleasantly surprised at the total amount of money (and time) involved; c) your estate will be cash-poor – not enough cash in the bank to pay these costs which means that; d) the net value of your estate, without proper planning and a source of replacement tax-free cash, could even be bankrupt which means your family and heirs would get zero. Do you and your family need assistance?

Some happy year-end thoughts!

An interesting year on many fronts – financial and societal. But have I learned anything I can use in the future? From a financial perspective, I very strongly believe we are going to get more of the same in 2013 that we had in 2012 – notwithstanding the “fiscal cliff” nonsense taking place in the Untied States (deliberate). Resolved or not, my best assessment is that world markets will be slightly chaotic for at least the next 2 years before some level of stability re-appears. Am I psychic?? Absolutely not – but I am a fiscal realist. On a relative basis, Canada is better off that just about everwhere in the world with the exception of New Zealand. For my younger audience, NZ did go bankrupt as a country about 30 years ago – and ever since have kept things fiscally responsible.

Canada may be the best of a bad lot, but we are certainly not having the country’s finances managed in any way, shape or form in a conservative manner. Quite frankly (and I am not, have not been and never expect to be a member of ANY political party), our proclivite spending habits are much more reminiscent of Liberal and NDP spending patterns.

Over the past 18 months or so, there has been a real shift around the world to a more socialistic approach to all levels of government. Citizens of all countries are demanding more services and support from their governments yet no-one wants to pay the price. It is the same in North America, Europe, South America, the Far,Middle and Near-Easts plus the former Soviet states, the Indian sub-continent and Australasia. The people in the Sahara and sub-Saharan regions in Africa are facing even more serious issues of civil wars and genocoide, on one or more levels. The Scandinavian folks are much quieter about things in their part of the world, but they are facing the same issues as the rest of the Eurozone as our our friends in Iceland.

Governments have no money, unless they print more – which brings inflation back into the picture in a big way – something no-one in the world can afford. Some parts of South America are dealing with double-digit inflation now – but on a WEEKLY basis – not annually! So with no money for governments to spend, national debts are growing in leaps and bounds (regardless of the “blue” colours of some leaders), from where does the money originate?

People are still hesitant to invest for the long-term and are spooked every time a politician anywhere in the world, talks about defaulting, restructuring, devaluing or cutting deficits without raising taxes. All of which makes for choppy markets. Yes the Warren Buffet’s and George Soros’ of this world will always make money, because they take the long view.

I haven’t mentioned China and South Korea (or the rest of the Asian-Pacific Rim countries) because despite generally higher levels of “state” control over their economies, they are in no better shape. Closed and partly closed economies may appear to be doing better, but we never really see the complete truth – so in the absence of clarity, investors tend to shy away from them as well.

So what to do now? Stay happy and think positive thoughts! Stay short on the fixed-income side of things and use GIC or GIA ladders to protect yourself against upward movement in rates. Keep at least 5% to 7% in cash. In equities, for less than 15 years holding, stay with large caps that have good dividend histories, or mutual funds/seg funds that hold those stocks. For 15 years and longer – right now, your guess is as good as anyone’s! Have a safe and happy Christmas Season! Cheers Ian