You want back into stocks…but should it be growth or value?

Decades ago, the academic community and financial services industry, in an effort to better understand what causes good versus bad rates of return in stock markets, began studying differing styles of investment management. There isn’t a hope of my staying awake long enough to cover even a sampling of the variety of styles that are out there, so I’ll keep it simple. Two styles in particular get plenty of attention: growth and value.

With the growth style, portfolio managers use their ingenuity to identify companies that are growing most rapidly. Since I carried around a BlackBerry (aka CrackBerry) for many years, I’ll use its creator Research in Motion (RIM) as an example. When the company was first getting its legs, it offered me and other research analysts a free trial of a little device with a monochrome screen that allowed you to send and receive text messages. We became addicted to them overnight and believed that this kind of service would catch on. Early movers can grow businesses very quickly with sufficient research depth, management expertise, and capital. We professional money managers provided the capital to RIM and the rest is history.

Early on, RIM was a growth company because even though they weren’t profitable and wouldn’t be making money for many years, the company kept selling more and more units. Revenues grew like crazy and, with some occasional disruptions (a market crisis, the technology bubble bursting), so did the stock price.

Portfolio managers who specialize in companies such as RIM are commonly called growth managers. The funds they manage are “growth funds.” The portfolio will usually have many stocks in various industries. They can be fast growing companies in slow growth industries or companies benefitting from an industry that is suddenly growing. Growth stocks can be very expensive. Investors expect the company to grow fast and so are willing to pay a higher price. However, you’ll have to buy a book explaining price/earnings (P/E) ratios, P/E to growth rate ratios, price/sales (P/S) ratios if you really want to get into security analysis yourself.

A value manager is more interested in buying and owning cheap stocks. Some companies grow slowly but pay their shareowners high dividends as compensation. A stock can be in an industry that is out of favour with the investment herd, or an industry can be out of favour entirely, making all the stocks in the sector cheaper. There are measures such as price/book ratios (P/B) and price to net asset value ratios that analysts use to gauge whether a stock is cheap or not.

Growth funds are considered riskier or more volatile than value funds. For instance, if the market is going higher because of a particularly strong economy, then the growth fund should go even higher still. A value manager might not perform as well as a growth manager in a bull market but won’t do as poorly in a bear market. A value manager is therefore considered more conservative.

A strategist friend of mine of TD Newcrest Research allows me to use his charts on occasion.  One of the most telling charts compares growth stocks in the S&P 500 Index to Value stocks.  The adjacent chart is an older one.  When the line is rising, growth stocks are significantly outperforming value stocks.  You can see vividly the technology bubble – growth stocks skyrocketing relative to value stocks – prior to the bubble bursting in the year 2000.

The shaded areas are periods of economic stimulation (US Federal Bank monetary easing).  During these periods it’s not unusual for growth funds to perform much more strongly than value-oriented funds.

Conventional wisdom says that conservative investors who can’t stomach as much volatility should use value funds and that investors who don’t mind a wild ride should use growth funds. Alternatively, you can invest most of your money into a value fund while also putting some into a growth fund so that you might occasionally get more returns in a buoyant market with at least a portion of your savings.

Why not growth when growth is performing and value at other times?

There are portfolio managers like me who hate being pigeonholed into either one of these styles. However, it is inevitable that one label or the other will be associated with a money manager because of the way consulting services are compensated and the way mutual funds are marketed (when growth is sexy, it only makes sense to promote the growth manager).

A maverick investor who understands the ebbs and flows of market sentiment will want to be invested in their favourite growth fund at the right time and to switch into a value fund at other times.

Whenever I’ve recommended a more active approach to selecting mutual funds in print or on television, such as using a growth fund and switching into a value fund when appropriate, I always get the same question: “How do you know when to switch?”

There is an easy answer, but nobody likes hearing it. The answer is: “You will know!” You should switch when your intuition or emotions tell you not too. It is that simple. If the fund you own has been doing extremely well and drifted up towards the top quartile or is now in the “best performing funds” category (rankings are available from a wide variety of publicly available services) and so you’ve begun to love it dearly, it’s time to switch into a different style of fund.

Here is a more current chart.  In this case the shaded areas are periods of recession, and we are all aware that for the past few years monetary stimulus has been the norm.  Not surprisingly then, growth stocks – avoided by most investors like the plague – have been outperforming value stocks.

As investors divest their income biased stocks (and bonds) they will naturally be tempted to move the money into the better performing growth style.  However if history (and experience) is any guide, they’d be well advised to focus their attention on stocks and funds that have not yet participated in the recent market rally.  In the event that government policy, encouraged by the rebound in the housing market, strong corporate earnings and slowly improving employment outlook, becomes less stimulative then value will in all likelihood become the place to be.

Mal Spooner

 

 

 

 

 

Is AAPL bruised or beginning to rot?

There’s a huge difference between Apple the company and AAPL the stock.  Back in July when the stock seemed to headed to the stratosphere I began to get concerned.  At the risk of seeming ridiculous (which has never stopped me before fyi) I will quote myself at the time:

 “The market value of Apple Inc. has ballooned.  It really hasn’t mattered that Android devices are kicking butt; rapidly gaining market share and being adopted by the more technology-savvy consumers (the nerdy trailblazers).  Until now?” July 29th, 2012

Apple’s 2nd quarter results had just been released and were considered disappointing by most analysts.  However my misgivings were based more on experience than the company fundamentals.  Over decades I’ve watched stock market darlings follow a pattern time and again.  At the outset it’s product itself that folks fall in love with, but eventually it’s the company’s stock they become infatuated with.

Admittedly the rewards to the company are plentiful if the product catches fire, especially in the middle stages of the lifecycle (pricing power and growing demand), but gradually management is obliged to focus on producing more and more of the product; which can mean skyrocketing revenues and economies of scale (reduced costs of manufacturing) – good for the company and its investors.  Eventually competition rears its ugly head, and the company is forced to innovate rapidly (rising expenses) to keep market share.  Competition (Android devices offered by the likes of Samsung, Research in Motion) will inevitably cause prices and profit margins to fall.

Finding a new hit ‘premium-priced’ product is difficult to do unless the company is managed by a tyrannical genius like Henry Ford or Steve Jobs (who can be oblivious to the rantings of those myopic stakeholders who’d rather have dividends than invest in research and development).

One might think that the stockprice should mirror the fortunes of the company.  But there are periods when this just isn’t the case.  This is the chart I was looking at (back in the summer months) when I began to get the heebeejeebies.  The financial results weren’t that impressive, but the share price had gathered its own momentum.

A GOOD  THING: Lineups to buy iPhones and iPads.  DANGEROUS: Lineups to buy shares.

I like to think the stock market  is like a party.  When my daughter was a teenager, she asked if my wife and I could disappear for a few hours one evening so she could invite some friends over for a party (I’m sure this has happened to many of you).  Things went fine until a contingent of uninvited guests began showing up.  No doubt a few more youngsters added to the fun, but once the house was too crowded bad things began to happen – items got broken, drinks were spilled on hardwood floors and carpets, there were empty bottles scattered all over the property and suddently her little party turned into into a nightmare.

When uninvited people (not really investors) scramble to own a stock it usually ends up like my daughter’s party.  At first a few more (uninvited) investors drives up the price which is great for existing shareholders and the company.  Indeed, AAPL shares continued to ramp up into the final quarter of 2012.  But just like my daughters party, things began to get ugly for the stock once it got too crowded.

 There is much speculation concerning the causes of the rapid decline in the price of AAPL shares:  Weak demand for the iPhone V, the threat of Android market penetration and so forth.  Some of this might be true, but pure speculation doesn’t ordinarily impact the price of a company’s shares this radically.  Hard evidence will hurt the stock to be sure but my own experience is that as soon as people realize they’re at a party that just isn’t as much fun as they’d hoped for then they all try to leave at the same time.  There is a great deal of risk associated with buying into stock market darlings.

I mentioned above that there can be a huge difference between the fortunes of the company and the behavior of the stock.  It could very well turn out that Apple (the company) will continue to thrive despite the decline in the share price.  After all there are a great number of people that still plan to buy iPhones.  No doubt there are also many planning to buy other Apple devices.

A recent survey suggested that 50% of those asked what smartphone they intend to buy over the next ninety days said they wanted an iPhone.  This is the same result Apple has enjoyed for that past couple of years.  There will come a time when the company will have to come up with another big hit product or re-invent itself.  After all the company was nearly banktrupt once (1987) and survived.  The introduction of the iPhone in 2007 certainly gave Apple another shot of adrenalin.

There’s no evidence to suggest Apple the company is beginning to rot just yet, but AAPL the stock was due to take a bruising.  Can Apple continue to take advantage of its solid franchise indefinitely without Steve Jobs?  Well that’s the billion dollar question isn’t it?

Mal Spooner