Year End Review 2014 and 2015 Preview

Let’s Talk About the Market Numbers…

Note that this report pertains most directly to portfolios operated under the guidelines, rules, and disciplines of Market Cycle Investment Management (MCIM). MCIM produces disciplined “High Quality Growth & Income Portfolios”, designed to maintain and/or to grow income regardless of the direction taken by markets or interest rates.

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Both markets have been good to MCIMers this year: Investment Grade Value Stock Index (IGVSI) equities produced plenty of profits and dividend income, while the income Closed End Funds (CEFs) produced much higher yields than many “experts” would admit even exist… and occasional profits.

On the negative side, new equity investment opportunities were scarce, and many income CEFs reduced their payouts slightly, reflecting more than six years of historically low interest rates. I suspect that both conditions will be reversed soon.

A recent (unaudited) review of known MCIM “Working Capital” produced some interesting numbers, even without including year end dividends:

• Roughly 35% of total realized income was disbursed
• Nearly 25% of growth purpose capital remained in “smart cash” reserves for scheduled disbursements… and anticipated lower prices on equities. (Smart cash comes from income and profits)
• Roughly 65% of total earnings was reinvested in new and old securities
• New “Working Capital” was produced at a rate somewhere between 9% and 10%
• Less than 20% of investors made additions to investment programs, eschewing income yields in excess of 6%
• None ot selected MCIM portfolios lost Working Capital… even after culling “poorest performers” throughout the year.

Working Capital” (total cost basis of securities + cash) is a realistic performance evaluation number…. it doesn’t shrink either during corrections or as a result of spikes in interest rates. It continues to grow so long as dividends, interest, profits and deposits exceed realized losses and disbursements.

Using the “Working Capital Model” facilitates preparation for future income needs with every decision made throughout the history of an investment program… MCIM working capital grows every month, regardless of changes in market value, so long as the investor disburses less than the portfolio is producing.

Year end is always a good time for investors to review asset allocation and projected income needs… if you are over 50 and haven’t considered the subject, it’s time to do so. If you expect to start withdrawing from your portfolios in the next few years, you need to determine if asset allocation changes are necessary.

If your income allocation is not generating at least 6% in spending money, or 401k balances are subject to shrinkage when the stock market corrects, it’s time to deal with these problems.

If you are not taking advantage of 6%+ tax free yields (and a higher range in taxable CEFs), you owe it to yourself to investigate the opportunities.

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So is there a “Grinch” in your 2015 portfolio performance future? What’s likely to happen?

The Stock Market is about to finish 2014 at the highest year end number ever recorded, and with each new “ATH”, the likelihood of a market correction increases… this 6.75 year rally is the longest, broadest, and most stubborn in stock market history.

So long as income investors are abused with artificially low rates, a gradual reduction in yields is likely to hold income CEFs around current prices… higher future rates are already anticipated in current market values.

Once higher rates become reality, there are several reasons why CEF prices should firm and, over the longer term, rise, with increased income production…

But even if the correction starts tomorrow, what has nearly 40 years of financial history taught us about the MCIM “much-higher-quality-and-income-than-any-other-form-of-investment-portfolio” methodology?

The IGVSI universe, high quality ADRs, REITS, MLPs, Royalty Trusts, plus Equity and Income CEFs should logically have been expected to fare better than the stock market averages during the three financial crises of our lifetimes. Many MCIM users can attest to this, but the logic is clear.

Every security produces income, and reasonable profits are always realized. New equity investments are only made when prices have fallen 20% or more; income securities are added to at lower prices to reduce cost basis and increase yield. Not to mention the fact that MCIMers invest only in the highest S & P quality ranked companies, filtered further by dividend history, NYSE, and profitability.

MCIM users were low on equities in August 1987 but fully invested by November; they owned no mutual funds, no NASDAQ securities, and no IPOs in 1999; they lost virtually no working capital, reinvested all earnings, and rebounded quickly from the financial crisis.

Most investors, particularly Mutual Fund owners and 401k participants were blindsided, not once, but on all three occasions. The S & P 500 has gained only 3% per year in the 15 it has taken to get to its current level!

So if the rally continues, Working Capital growth will continue right along with it. But when the correction comes along, cash reserves and continued income will likely be available to takes advantage of new opportunities that arise in the MCIM select group of potential investment securities.

The longer the correction (the financial crisis took roughly 20 MCIM months to reach bottom on March 9 2009), the more Working Capital will be available when the next round of stock market all time highs is upon us.

And again, most importantly I believe, all programmed income payments will be made on time and without dipping into capital…

Dealing With Stock Market Corrections: Ten Do’s and Don’ts

A correction is a beautiful thing, simply the flip side of a rally, big or small. Theoretically, corrections adjust equity prices to their actual value or “support levels”.  In reality, it may be easier than that.

Prices go down because of speculator reactions to expectations of news, speculator reactions to actual news, and investor profit taking.

The two former “becauses” are more potent than ever before because there is more self-directed money out there than ever before. And therein lies the core of correctional beauty!

Mutual Fund holders rarely take profits but often take losses. Additionally, the new breed of Index Fund speculators is ready for a reality check. If this brief hiccup becomes a full blown correction, new investment opportunities will be abundant.

Here’s a list of ten things to think about doing, or to avoid doing, during corrections of any magnitude:

1. Your present Asset Allocation is based upon long-term goals and objectives. Resist the urge to decrease your Equity allocation because you expect lower stock prices. That would be an attempt to time the market. Asset allocation decisions should have nothing to do with stock market expectations.

2. Take a look at the past. There has never been a correction that has not proven to be a buying opportunity, so start collecting a diverse group of Investment Grade Value Stocks as they move lower in price. I start shopping at 20% below the 52-week high water mark… the shelves are full of bargains.

3. Don’t hoard the “smart cash” you accumulated during the rally, and don’t get yourself agitated if you buy some issues too soon. There are no crystal balls, and no place for hindsight in an investment strategy. Buying too soon, and selling too soon is investing brilliance.

4. Take a look at the future; you can’t tell when the rally will resume or how long it will last. If you are buying IGVSI equities now, you will to love the next rally even more than the last… with yet another round of profits.

5. As the correction continues, buy more slowly as opposed to more quickly, and establish new positions incompletely. Hope for a short and steep decline, but prepare for a long one. There’s more to “Shop at The Gap” than meets the eye, and you should run out of cash well before the new rally begins.

6. Your use of “Smart Cash” proves the wisdom of Market Cycle Investment Management; it should be gone while the market is still falling… gets less scary  every time. So long your cash flow continues unabated, the change in market value is just scary, not income (or life) threatening.

7.  Note that your Working Capital is still growing in spite of falling market values, and examine holdings for opportunities to reduce cost basis per share or to increase yield on income Closed End Funds). Examine fundamentals and price; lean hard on your experience; don’t force the issue.

8. Identify new buying opportunities using a consistent set of rules, rally or correction. That way you will always know which of the two you are dealing with in spite of media hype and propaganda. Focus on Investment Grade Value Stocks; it’s easier, less risky, and better for your peace of mind.

9. Examine portfolio performance with your asset allocation and investment objectives in focus and in terms of market/interest rate cycles as opposed to calendar quarters and years. The Working Capital Model allows for your personal asset allocation.

Remember. too, that there is really no single index number to use for comparison purposes with a properly designed MCIM portfolio.

10.  So long as everything is “down”, there is nothing to worry about. Downgraded (or simply lazy) portfolio holdings should NOT be discarded during general or group specific weakness.  BUT, you must have the courage to cull them during rallies… also general or sector specifical (sic).

Corrections (of all types) will vary in depth and duration, and both characteristics are clearly visible only in institutional rear view mirrors. The short and deep ones are most lovable (kind of like men, I’m told); the long and slow ones are more difficult to deal with.

If you overthink the environment or overcook the research, you’ll miss the party.

Stock Market realities need to be dealt with quickly, decisively, and with zero hindsight. Because amid all of the uncertainty, there is one indisputable fact that reads equally well in either market direction:

There has never been a correction or a rally that has not succumbed to the next rally or correction..

Your (401k) Investment Portfolio: What’s Next

Seven years or so ago, the broad market tracking S & P 500 Index inched past the much higher quality, dividend paying NYSE equity only, Investment Grade Value Stock Index (IGVSI) for the first time in the 21st century. Income Closed End Funds began their Financial Crisis enhanced decline a few months earlier.

Four years ago, the IGVSI had surpassed its 2007 high while the S & P 500 languished significantly lower. Three years ago, both the IGVSI and Closed End Income Funds were ahead of the S & P 500. Two years ago, the index of income CEFS and the IGVSI were above 2007 levels; the S & P 500 was not.
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Twenty seven years or so ago, all of the market averages established new all time highs through the middle of August, went boring for about two months, and then crashed spectacularly in an hysterical, short-lived, free fall. Income securities had been beaten down by rising interest rates for a year or more, but rallied when interest rate cuts were used to help reverse the market tailspin… there were few income CEFs at the time.

Twenty six years or so ago, the high quality stocks + 30% or more income purpose securities asset allocation formula had totally erased the crash, while the S & P struggled about 3 years to regain August ’87 levels.
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Seventeen years or so ago, a stock market correction ended, and the greatest ever “no value-at-all” stock market con game began. NASDAQ equities, and a dozen or so high tech components of the S & P 500, led the lemmings over the dot.com cliff while most high quality equities were discarded irreverently. The NASDAQ remains below turn of the century levels.

There was no interest at all in anything that produced income, tax free or otherwise.

Fourteen years or so ago, while many of the most popular mutual funds went belly-up, IGVSI components and closed end income funds + other income securities again proved to be a viable growth and income formula, as they pushed MCIM (Market Cycle Investment Management) portfolios to new highs while nearly everything else was pummeled.
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Beginning to see a pattern here? What’s in your wallet?

Study this chart of the past seven years (www.sancoservices.com/MCIMvsSP500.xls). Then insert the three major meltdown scenarios (and recoveries) sketched above. All three were different, but the safest path through them was the same.

Today, we have thousands of, MPT-spawned, derivative speculation machines, creating equity valuations that are just plain ludicrous in the face of all that is wrong with the economic environment. There are similarities to both the 1987 “crash” and to the “dot com bubble”… it’s just a matter of time, and too few of you (and your 401ks) are prepared for the inevitable.

It’s time to take your profits and run… run as fast as you possibly can… to a safer and historically proven, long term focused, working capital growth and income production machine.

Just ask the “investment shadow”, or your advisor, to help you find it.