MONEY News

MONEY News: Mergers and Acquisitions- AT&T and Time Warner Inc.

AT&T’s Stock Could Be a Great Bargain for Investors

AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) reached a new 52-week low on Tuesday as the company released its third-quarter earnings which failed to impress investors. AT&T’s revenue of $39.67 billion fell short of the $40.10 billion that was expected. Year-over-year, sales were down 3% as the company saw a decline in its legacy wireline services as well as its consumer mobility segment. Earnings per share of $0.74 also fell short of estimates, just narrowly missing the $0.75 that was expected by analysts.

AT&T also add less wireless customers than was expected, although their postpaid churn rate of 0.84% was well below the 1.08% estimated by analysts.

Despite a soft quarter, AT&T did not adjust down its guidance for 2017.

The stock was only down 1% on the disappointing results, but this is because earlier in the month AT&T’s stock declined 6% when the company sent out a warning stating that it was going to show a net loss of 90,000 video subscribers in the coming quarter.

Had the company not sent out that warning, we likely would have seen more of a decline in the share price. However, there is reason for optimism with the company still working on closing its acquisition of Time Warner Inc (NYSE:TWX), which will further expand its offerings and solidify a stronger grip on the market.

With a dividend of 5.6% and a price to earnings multiple of just 16, AT&T might be a great buy coming off a poorer than expected earnings result. Over the long term the future should present plenty of opportunities for growth that will more than offset any short-term struggles.

Index and Sector ETFs: Mutual Funds: Speculation X3

How many of you remember the immortal words of P. T. Barnum? On Wall Street, the incubation period for new product scams may be measured in years instead of minutes, but the end result is always a greed-driven rush to financial disaster.

The dot.com meltdown spawned index mutual funds, and their dismal failure gave life to “enhanced” index funds, a wide variety of speculative hedge funds, and a rapidly growing assortment of Index ETFs. Deja Vu all over again, with the popular ishare variety of ETF leading the lemmings to the cliffs.

How far will we allow Wall Street to move us away from the basic building blocks of investing? Whatever happened to stocks and bonds? The Investment Gods are appalled.

A market or sector index is a statistical measuring device that tracks prices in securities selected to represent a portion of the overall market. ETF creators:

  • select a sampling of the market that they expect to be representative of the whole,
  • purchase the securities, and then
  • issue the ishares, SPDRS, CUBEs, etc. that speculators then trade on the exchanges just like equities.

Unlike ordinary index funds, ETF shares are not handled directly by the fund. As a result, they can move either up or down from the value of the securities in the fund, which, in turn, may or may not mirror the index they were selected to track. Confused? There’s more — these things are designed for manipulation.

Unlike managed Closed-End Funds (CEFs), ETF shares can be created or redeemed by market specialists, and Institutional Investors can redeem 50,000 share lots (in kind) if there is a gap between the net-asset-value and the market price of the fund.

These activities create artificial demand in an attempt to minimize the gap between NAV and market price. Clearly, arbitrage activities provide profit-making opportunities to the fund sponsors that are not available to the shareholders. Perhaps that is why the fund expenses are so low — and why there are now thousands of the things to choose from.

Two other ETF idiosyncrasies need to be appreciated:

a) performance return statistics for index funds may not include expenses, but it should be obvious that none will ever outperform their market, and

b) index funds may publish P/E numbers that only include the profitable companies in the portfolio.

So, in addition to the normal risks associated with investing, we add: speculating in narrowly focused sectors, guessing on the prospects of unproven small cap companies, experimenting with securities in single countries, rolling the dice on commodities, and hoping for the eventual success of new technologies.

We then call this hodge-podge of speculation a diversified, passively managed, inexpensive approach to Modern Asset Management — based solely on the mathematical hocus pocus of Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT).

Once upon a time, but not so long ago, there were high yield junk bond funds that the financial community insisted were appropriate investments because of their diversification. Does diversified junk become un-junk? Isn’t passive management as much of an oxymoron as variable annuity? Who are they kidding?

But let’s not dwell upon the three or more levels of speculation that are the very foundation of all index and sector funds. Let’s move on to the two basic ideas that led to the development of plain vanilla Mutual Funds in the first place: diversification and professional management.

Mutual Funds were a monumental breakthrough that changed the investment world. Hands-on investing became possible for everyone. Self-directed retirement programs and cheap to administer employee benefit programs became doable.

The investment markets, once the domain of the wealthy, became the savings accounts of choice for the employed masses — because the “separate accounts” were both trusteed and professionally managed. When security self-direction came along, professional management was gone forever. Mutual fund management was delegated to the financially uneducated masses.

ETFs are not the antidote for the mob-managed & dismal long term performance of open end Mutual Funds, where professionals are always forced to sell low and to buy high. ETFs are the vehicles of choice for Wall Street to ram MPT mumbo jumbo down the throats of busy, inexperienced investors… and the regulators who love them because they are cheap.

Mutual fund performance is bad (long term, again) because managers have to do what the mob tells them to do — so Wall Street sells “passive products” with controlled content that they can manipulate more cheaply.

Here’s a thumbnail sketch of how well passive ETFs may have performed from the turn of the century through 2013: the DJIA growth rate was about 0% per year, the S & P 500 was negative; the NASDAQ Composite has just recently regained its 2000 value.

How many positive sectors, technologies, commodities, or capitalization categories could there have been?

Now subtract the fees… hmmmm. Again, how would those ETFs have fared? Hey, when you buy cheap and easy, it’s usually worth it. Now if you want performance, I suggest you try real management, as opposed to Mutual Fund management… but you need to take the time to understand the process.

If you can’t understand or accept the strategy, don’t hire the manager. Mutual Funds and ETFs cannot “beat the market” (not a well thought out investment objective anyway) because both are effectively managed by investor/speculators… not by professionals.

Sure, you might find some temporary smiles in your ETFs, but only if you take your profits will the smiles last. There may be times when it makes sense to use these products to hedge against a specific risk. But stop kidding yourself every time Wall Street comes up with a new short cut to investment success.

There is no reason why all of you can’t either run your own investment portfolio, or instruct someone as to how you want it done. Every guess, every estimate, every hedge, every sector bet, and every shortcut increases portfolio risk.

Products and gimmicks are never the answer. ETFs, a combination of the two, don’t even address the question properly — AND their rising popularity has raised the risk level throughout the Stock Market. How’s that, you ask?

The demand for the individual stocks included in ETFs is raising their prices without having anything to do with company fundamentals.

What’s in your portfolio?

How will ETFs and Mutual Funds fare in the next correction?

Are YOU ready.

A Preemptive, Timeless, Portfolio Protection Strategy

A participant in the morning Market Cycle Investment Management (MCIM) workshop observed: I’ve noticed that my account balances are near all time high levels. People are talking down the economy and the dollar. Is there any preemptive action I need to take?

An afternoon workshop attendee spoke of a similar predicament, but cautioned that a repeat of the June 2007 through early March 2009 correction must be avoided — a portfolio protection plan is essential!

What were they missing?

These investors were taking pretty much for granted the fact that their investment portfolios had more than merely survived the most severe correction in financial market history. They had recouped all of their market value, and maintained their cash flow to boot. The market averages seemed afraid to move higher.

Their preemptive portfolio protection plan was already in place — and it worked amazingly well, as it certainly should for anyone who follows the general principles and disciplined strategies of the MCIM.

But instead of patting themselves on the back for their proper preparation and positioning, here they were, lamenting the possibility of the next dip in securities’ prices. Corrections, big and small, are a simple fact of investment life whose origination point can only be identified using rear view mirrors.

Investors constantly focus on the event instead of the opportunity that the event represents. Being retrospective instead of hindsightful helps us learn from our experiences. The length, depth, and scope of the financial crisis correction were unknowns in mid-2007. The parameters of the recent advance are just as much of a mystery now.

MCIM forces us to prepare for cyclical oscillations by requiring that: a) we take reasonable profits quickly whenever they are available, b) we maintain our “cost-based” asset allocation formula using long-term (retirement, etc.) goals, and c) we slowly move into new opportunities only after downturns that the “conventional wisdom” identifies as correction level— i. e., twenty percent.

  • So, a better question, concern, or observation during an unusually long rally, given the extraordinary performance scenario that these investors acknowledge, would be: What can I do to take advantage of the market cycle even more effectively — the next time?

The answer is as practically simple as it is emotionally difficult. You need to add to portfolios during precipitous or long term market downturns to take advantage of lower prices — just as you would do in every other aspect of your life. You need first to establish new positions, and then to add to old ones that continue to live up to WCM (Working Capital Model) quality standards.

You need to maintain your asset allocation by adding to income positions properly, and monitor cost based diversification levels closely. You need to apply cyclical patience and understanding to your thinking and hang on to the safety bar until the climb back up the hill makes you smile. Repeat the process. Repeat the process. Repeat the process.

The retrospective?

The MCIM methodology was nearly fifteen years old when the robust 1987 rally became the dreaded “Black Monday”, (computer loop?) correction of October 19th. Sudden and sharp, that 50% or so correction proved the applicability of a methodology that had fared well in earlier minor downturns.

According to the guidelines, portfolio “smart cash” was building through August; new buying overtook profit taking early in September, and continued well into 1988.

Ten years later, there was a slightly less disastrous correction, followed by clear sailing until 9/11. There was one major difference: the government didn’t kill any companies or undo market safeguards that had been in place since the Great Depression.

Dot-Com Bubble! What Dot-Com Bubble?

Working Capital Model buying rules prohibit the type of rampant speculation that became Wall Street vogue during that era. The WCM credo after the bursting was: “no NASDAQ, no Mutual Funds, no IPOs, no Problem.” Investment Grade Value Stocks (IGVSI stocks) regained their luster as the no-value-no-profits securities slip-slided away into the Hudson.

Embarrassed Wall Street investment firms used their influence to ban the “Brainwashing of the American Investor” book and sent the authorities in to stifle the free speech of WCM users — just a rumor, really.

Once again, through the “Financial Crisis”, for the umpteenth time in the forty years since its development, Working Capital Model operating systems have proven that they are an outstanding Market Cycle Investment Management Methodology.

And what was it that the workshop participants didn’t realize they had — a preemptive portfolio protection strategy for the entire market cycle. One that even a caveman can learn to use effectively.

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One Person’s Bond Crash is Another’s Income Opportunity

Today’s “Investment News” headline (from Bloomberg) is designed to make you shiver in your income portfolio boots:

“Big fixed income shop prepares for the worst”…

The Bond Portfolio “Window Dressing” sell-off has begun.

Bond funds in general are now holding 8% of assets in cash, the article reports…highest since the financial crisis, and 1999, even. Professional Bond Traders certainly have reason to worry; closed end fund income investors not so much.

The article is reporting fear of lower market values with respect to existing bonds, particularly the higher yield variety…. big players in the bond market are hoarding cash (even selling existing holdings at losses in the process).

Bond Traders and Fund Managers look foolish as inventory market values fall. The cash hoard is their way of preparing to buy similar paper at higher yields sometime in the future and/or to buy back “old” bonds after the fall in price.

In the meantime, they are holding zero interest rate cash in anticipation of the higher yields… and could care less about the negative impact this behavior has on portfolio yields.

This is the result of what I call “Total Return Crossover”… the absurd application of market value growth analysis, instead of income development criteria, to primarily income security portfolios. (An analytical atrocity that is reinforced and encouraged by retirement plan regulators.)

So bond and Income Mutual Fund managers choose to actually lose your money now to look less foolish than the competition later. This “panic selling” by professionals leads to irrational, “knee jerk” reactions in amateurs.

What I did not read in the Bloomberg “disaster scenario” (and this should calm all the frayed nerves) was any indication or expectation of default on the interest paid by the bond issuers. This is the key issue with income investing…

Bonds are corporate and government debt securities, people… so long as they pay the interest why worry about the market value?

Wall Street is always more concerned about appearances than it is about income generation. And the Masters of the Universe really do have a problem… OMG, what this could do to those year-end bonuses…

But we (the average investors out here) can simply reinvest our current CEF income in any number of portfolios of bonds, preferred stocks, loans, notes, etc., selling at discounts, not only from their maturity value, but also from their combined Net Asset Values. Read that again please.

Remember, Closed End Income Fund portfolios aren’t influenced directly by either the fear (or greed) of individual investors… they are under a “protective dome”, if you will, that is subject to all forms of volatility for a vast array of reasons.

But an Income CEF, for example, becomes the totally liquid trading vehicle for a portfolio that could contain hundreds of totally illiquid individual securities… do you believe in magic? Be it Magic, or genius, who cares. We, mere mortals that we are, can jump on the lower prices that chill the blood of Wall Street’s Master Class.

Closed End Fund investors are uniquely positioned to take advantage of both the lower prices and the higher yields that exist right now. Market Cycle Investment Management users have done it before, right?

Remember the fall in CEF prices from early 2007 (higher rates caused these) through early March 2009 (even in the face of the lowest interest rates ever)… and the ensuing rise through October 2011?

Well, do you really think that the anticipated one percentage point rise in interest rates over the next year or so will cause Financial Crisis #2?

Isn’t it great when Wall Street’s pain becomes fuel for the small investor’s gain…. but only if you take advantage of the lower price, higher yield scenario that is staring you in the face as you read this message..

Yes, YOU can be the Master of this Universe!

Income CEF Price Volatility… No Problem at All

Market Cycle Investment Management portfolios are different from any others you may be analyzing, and all investors analyze their portfolios most intently when their “bottom line” market values begin to crumble. This focus on market value is part of Wall Street’s Brainwashing of the American Investor.

MCIM investing is more realistic. It recognizes that investment markets (both equity and income) are cyclical. Rarely do portfolio market values trend upward as long as they have since March of 2009, and most equity investors have forgotten the five month, 22%, mini-correction that ran from May through September 2011. When will we experience the real deal?

MCIM focuses on “working capital”, a measure of the total cost basis of the securities and cash contained in an investment portfolio. Managed properly, this measure should grow in all market, economic, and interest rate environments, irrespective of changes in “market value”… really.

MCIM portfolios include 30% Income Purpose securities (based on Working Capital), and never own non Investment Grade Value Stock equities. This translates into portfolios of high quality securities, each contributing to higher realized base income than that contained in market averages and blended Mutual Funds.

Embracing the cycles, MCIM portfolios strive to grow both total Working Capital and portfolio “Base Income”steadily, regardless of what is going on in the investment markets, in either direction.

MCIM portfolio “Working Capital” will be higher now than on January 1st; and “base income” will have risen in all portfolios where cash flow has remained positive… in spite of lower CEF market values. Long term, this is the single most important of all portfolio management issues.

Income Closed End Fund (CEF) prices have been moving lower since November 2012; the decline accelerated in May — but with barely any change in total income generated. In November 2012, you’ll recall, many CEFs were selling at premiums to NAV. The premiums are now gone, taking a whole lot of market value with them… but, again, with little or no change in income.

Stock market numbers have also weakened recently, and this 2.5 year divergence between equity and income security prices is quite normal; accelerated weakness in income security prices often signals an upcoming stock market correction, as it did in 2007..

The vast majority of income CEFs are now selling at significant discounts to the Net Asset Value of the security portfolios inside. The vast majority of income CEFs are selling at significant discounts to the market value of the securities they contain. (repetition intended)

Wall Street wants you to believe that higher prices and lower yields are better… how does that make any sense with no change in the portfolio content?

A selection universe of about one hundred taxable income CEFs and seventy tax free income CEFs is used in constructing MCIM portfolios. In the six plus years since the depths of the financial crisis, and in spite of the lowest interest rate environment in history, the vast majority of these CEFs have maintained their regular payouts to shareholders.

Lower prices now are as much a result of FED tinkering as threatened rate hikes.

Historically, in more “normal” interest rate environments, income increases have been more prevalent than income reductions. Overall, income CEF managers coped well with the lowest interest rates ever…. how have they been dealing with the specter of higher rates? Keep in mind that no actual interest rate change has yet occurred.

After six years of artificially low interest rates, many have been forced to reduce their payouts… very few have made significant dividend cuts.

Now the interesting part: at current prices, the average dividend yield on 57 taxable CEFs paying over 7.0% is approximately 8.5%; the average on 53 tax free CEFs paying over 6% is about 6.7%

The vast majority of all CEFs made their regular scheduled distributions throughout the financial crisis; more actually raised their payouts than reduced them; after six years of close-to-zero rates, higher “coupons” will eventually increase CEF dividend payouts to normal, pre-financial crisis, levels.

The current yield on the MCIM CEF Universe is well above 6% for tax free income and above 8% for taxable. Why is this bad news? Only, yes only, because professional bond traders have to realize losses when they trade… income investors do not have to sell at all…. they can take advantage of “discounts” to increase their spending money.

What’s lnside the CEFs:

• Each CEF portfolio contains hundreds of individual issues with varying qualities, maturities, call provisions, etc. The average duration is between 7 and 8 years

• Managers use short term borrowing to purchase additional securities; nothing forces them to borrow at higher rates if they can’t still invest profitably

• Managers capitalize on profit-taking opportunities; and are not forced to sell at losses.

• CEF share prices are completely “uncoupled” from NAV; shareholders are investing in the investment company as opposed to owning a piece of the investment portfolio itself.

As I see it, and this is no prediction or recommendation of any specific course of action, CEFs provide investors with the opportunity to take advantage of irrational price dislocations in the income securities market — an opportunity that is difficult for the average investor to capitalize upon using individual securities.

By adding to existing CEF positions, investors increase overall portfolio yield, increase yield on specific holdings, and reduce per share cost basis.

Thus, even if some reduced payouts are experienced, the overall level of income is likely to be at least stable, and possibly higher. Right now, the expectation of higher interest rates is probably the main force driving Closed End Fund prices lower.

BUT, particularly if the stock market corrects, higher interest rates and higher demand for safety may cause investors to seek out higher yielding and safer investments.

Never forget, all companies must pay their bond, note, and preferred stock investors BEFORE a penny goes to their Equity investors… income CEFs contain no equities, even though your (purposely) confusing Wall Street account statement tells you that they are equities…. hmmm

Year End Review 2014 and 2015 Preview

Let’s Talk About the Market Numbers…

Note that this report pertains most directly to portfolios operated under the guidelines, rules, and disciplines of Market Cycle Investment Management (MCIM). MCIM produces disciplined “High Quality Growth & Income Portfolios”, designed to maintain and/or to grow income regardless of the direction taken by markets or interest rates.

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Both markets have been good to MCIMers this year: Investment Grade Value Stock Index (IGVSI) equities produced plenty of profits and dividend income, while the income Closed End Funds (CEFs) produced much higher yields than many “experts” would admit even exist… and occasional profits.

On the negative side, new equity investment opportunities were scarce, and many income CEFs reduced their payouts slightly, reflecting more than six years of historically low interest rates. I suspect that both conditions will be reversed soon.

A recent (unaudited) review of known MCIM “Working Capital” produced some interesting numbers, even without including year end dividends:

• Roughly 35% of total realized income was disbursed
• Nearly 25% of growth purpose capital remained in “smart cash” reserves for scheduled disbursements… and anticipated lower prices on equities. (Smart cash comes from income and profits)
• Roughly 65% of total earnings was reinvested in new and old securities
• New “Working Capital” was produced at a rate somewhere between 9% and 10%
• Less than 20% of investors made additions to investment programs, eschewing income yields in excess of 6%
• None ot selected MCIM portfolios lost Working Capital… even after culling “poorest performers” throughout the year.

Working Capital” (total cost basis of securities + cash) is a realistic performance evaluation number…. it doesn’t shrink either during corrections or as a result of spikes in interest rates. It continues to grow so long as dividends, interest, profits and deposits exceed realized losses and disbursements.

Using the “Working Capital Model” facilitates preparation for future income needs with every decision made throughout the history of an investment program… MCIM working capital grows every month, regardless of changes in market value, so long as the investor disburses less than the portfolio is producing.

Year end is always a good time for investors to review asset allocation and projected income needs… if you are over 50 and haven’t considered the subject, it’s time to do so. If you expect to start withdrawing from your portfolios in the next few years, you need to determine if asset allocation changes are necessary.

If your income allocation is not generating at least 6% in spending money, or 401k balances are subject to shrinkage when the stock market corrects, it’s time to deal with these problems.

If you are not taking advantage of 6%+ tax free yields (and a higher range in taxable CEFs), you owe it to yourself to investigate the opportunities.

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So is there a “Grinch” in your 2015 portfolio performance future? What’s likely to happen?

The Stock Market is about to finish 2014 at the highest year end number ever recorded, and with each new “ATH”, the likelihood of a market correction increases… this 6.75 year rally is the longest, broadest, and most stubborn in stock market history.

So long as income investors are abused with artificially low rates, a gradual reduction in yields is likely to hold income CEFs around current prices… higher future rates are already anticipated in current market values.

Once higher rates become reality, there are several reasons why CEF prices should firm and, over the longer term, rise, with increased income production…

But even if the correction starts tomorrow, what has nearly 40 years of financial history taught us about the MCIM “much-higher-quality-and-income-than-any-other-form-of-investment-portfolio” methodology?

The IGVSI universe, high quality ADRs, REITS, MLPs, Royalty Trusts, plus Equity and Income CEFs should logically have been expected to fare better than the stock market averages during the three financial crises of our lifetimes. Many MCIM users can attest to this, but the logic is clear.

Every security produces income, and reasonable profits are always realized. New equity investments are only made when prices have fallen 20% or more; income securities are added to at lower prices to reduce cost basis and increase yield. Not to mention the fact that MCIMers invest only in the highest S & P quality ranked companies, filtered further by dividend history, NYSE, and profitability.

MCIM users were low on equities in August 1987 but fully invested by November; they owned no mutual funds, no NASDAQ securities, and no IPOs in 1999; they lost virtually no working capital, reinvested all earnings, and rebounded quickly from the financial crisis.

Most investors, particularly Mutual Fund owners and 401k participants were blindsided, not once, but on all three occasions. The S & P 500 has gained only 3% per year in the 15 it has taken to get to its current level!

So if the rally continues, Working Capital growth will continue right along with it. But when the correction comes along, cash reserves and continued income will likely be available to takes advantage of new opportunities that arise in the MCIM select group of potential investment securities.

The longer the correction (the financial crisis took roughly 20 MCIM months to reach bottom on March 9 2009), the more Working Capital will be available when the next round of stock market all time highs is upon us.

And again, most importantly I believe, all programmed income payments will be made on time and without dipping into capital…

Dealing With Stock Market Corrections: Ten Do’s and Don’ts

A correction is a beautiful thing, simply the flip side of a rally, big or small. Theoretically, corrections adjust equity prices to their actual value or “support levels”.  In reality, it may be easier than that.

Prices go down because of speculator reactions to expectations of news, speculator reactions to actual news, and investor profit taking.

The two former “becauses” are more potent than ever before because there is more self-directed money out there than ever before. And therein lies the core of correctional beauty!

Mutual Fund holders rarely take profits but often take losses. Additionally, the new breed of Index Fund speculators is ready for a reality check. If this brief hiccup becomes a full blown correction, new investment opportunities will be abundant.

Here’s a list of ten things to think about doing, or to avoid doing, during corrections of any magnitude:

1. Your present Asset Allocation is based upon long-term goals and objectives. Resist the urge to decrease your Equity allocation because you expect lower stock prices. That would be an attempt to time the market. Asset allocation decisions should have nothing to do with stock market expectations.

2. Take a look at the past. There has never been a correction that has not proven to be a buying opportunity, so start collecting a diverse group of Investment Grade Value Stocks as they move lower in price. I start shopping at 20% below the 52-week high water mark… the shelves are full of bargains.

3. Don’t hoard the “smart cash” you accumulated during the rally, and don’t get yourself agitated if you buy some issues too soon. There are no crystal balls, and no place for hindsight in an investment strategy. Buying too soon, and selling too soon is investing brilliance.

4. Take a look at the future; you can’t tell when the rally will resume or how long it will last. If you are buying IGVSI equities now, you will to love the next rally even more than the last… with yet another round of profits.

5. As the correction continues, buy more slowly as opposed to more quickly, and establish new positions incompletely. Hope for a short and steep decline, but prepare for a long one. There’s more to “Shop at The Gap” than meets the eye, and you should run out of cash well before the new rally begins.

6. Your use of “Smart Cash” proves the wisdom of Market Cycle Investment Management; it should be gone while the market is still falling… gets less scary  every time. So long your cash flow continues unabated, the change in market value is just scary, not income (or life) threatening.

7.  Note that your Working Capital is still growing in spite of falling market values, and examine holdings for opportunities to reduce cost basis per share or to increase yield on income Closed End Funds). Examine fundamentals and price; lean hard on your experience; don’t force the issue.

8. Identify new buying opportunities using a consistent set of rules, rally or correction. That way you will always know which of the two you are dealing with in spite of media hype and propaganda. Focus on Investment Grade Value Stocks; it’s easier, less risky, and better for your peace of mind.

9. Examine portfolio performance with your asset allocation and investment objectives in focus and in terms of market/interest rate cycles as opposed to calendar quarters and years. The Working Capital Model allows for your personal asset allocation.

Remember. too, that there is really no single index number to use for comparison purposes with a properly designed MCIM portfolio.

10.  So long as everything is “down”, there is nothing to worry about. Downgraded (or simply lazy) portfolio holdings should NOT be discarded during general or group specific weakness.  BUT, you must have the courage to cull them during rallies… also general or sector specifical (sic).

Corrections (of all types) will vary in depth and duration, and both characteristics are clearly visible only in institutional rear view mirrors. The short and deep ones are most lovable (kind of like men, I’m told); the long and slow ones are more difficult to deal with.

If you overthink the environment or overcook the research, you’ll miss the party.

Stock Market realities need to be dealt with quickly, decisively, and with zero hindsight. Because amid all of the uncertainty, there is one indisputable fact that reads equally well in either market direction:

There has never been a correction or a rally that has not succumbed to the next rally or correction..

DATELINE: New York Stock Exchange, Valentine’s Day, 2015

Alternative A: Valentine’s Day Massacre Highlights Frenzied Five Month Downturn!

Alternative B: Valentine’s Day Champagne Toasts Spectacular Six Year Rally!

No matter which of these scenarios plays out, your primary concern should be preparedness… a case could certainly be made for either. Market Cycle Investment Management (MCIM) investors have little reason to worry.

Equity Portfolios are lean and mean, augmented in recent months by a selection of “defensive” issues whose higher yield and business models make them less likely to erode as seriously as overpriced, lower yielding derivatives.

As usual, absolutely no reasonable profit has been allowed to go unrealized, and several non-performers have been removed from portfolios. Equity Bucket cash positions are abnormally high as a result of profit taking and a shorter than normal “buy list”.

Income levels in all portfolios are at an historical high for two reasons: the Equity Bucket REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust) and MLP (Master Limited Partnership) additions mentioned above and the continued cash flow dependability of both Income and Equity Closed End Funds.

The fact that income purpose securities are at lower market valuations (while generating about the same level of income) is an excellent income investing opportunity, but you need to add to your holdings to take advantage of it.

If you have a 5 year or less retirement window, it’s time to make some decisions.

If there is any portfolio where you have not harvested at least some of your profits (particularly in your 401ks and other self-directed retirement vehicles), why not do so while you can still obtain Tax Free 6% and Taxable 7.5% CEFs?

If you have been holding money in low yield guaranteed vehicles, it’s time to smell the roses… you’ve seen your CEFs pay their normal distributions, month after month after month… regardless of market conditions.

Talk to your 401k advisor and insist upon higher yielding, Collective Trust income options.

So which of the headliner scenarios is more likely? and should you really care?

No one really knows when the correction will begin, but everyone agrees that it will… eventually, and stealthily. And no, it shouldn’t really upset an MCIM user’s plans significantly.

Whenever the correction happens, your income purpose securities are likely to fall much less than in the financial crisis. Your equity positions (Investment Grade Value Stocks, REITS, and MLPs) historically do not fall as far as stocks of lesser quality… during the dot-com fiasco, they didn’t fall at all.

…and, after both the October ’87 “crash” and the more recent financial crisis, IGVSI stocks rebounded to new highs years before the S & P 500.

Of this I am certain, your 401k is not ready.

Your (401k) Investment Portfolio: What’s Next

Seven years or so ago, the broad market tracking S & P 500 Index inched past the much higher quality, dividend paying NYSE equity only, Investment Grade Value Stock Index (IGVSI) for the first time in the 21st century. Income Closed End Funds began their Financial Crisis enhanced decline a few months earlier.

Four years ago, the IGVSI had surpassed its 2007 high while the S & P 500 languished significantly lower. Three years ago, both the IGVSI and Closed End Income Funds were ahead of the S & P 500. Two years ago, the index of income CEFS and the IGVSI were above 2007 levels; the S & P 500 was not.
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Twenty seven years or so ago, all of the market averages established new all time highs through the middle of August, went boring for about two months, and then crashed spectacularly in an hysterical, short-lived, free fall. Income securities had been beaten down by rising interest rates for a year or more, but rallied when interest rate cuts were used to help reverse the market tailspin… there were few income CEFs at the time.

Twenty six years or so ago, the high quality stocks + 30% or more income purpose securities asset allocation formula had totally erased the crash, while the S & P struggled about 3 years to regain August ’87 levels.
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Seventeen years or so ago, a stock market correction ended, and the greatest ever “no value-at-all” stock market con game began. NASDAQ equities, and a dozen or so high tech components of the S & P 500, led the lemmings over the dot.com cliff while most high quality equities were discarded irreverently. The NASDAQ remains below turn of the century levels.

There was no interest at all in anything that produced income, tax free or otherwise.

Fourteen years or so ago, while many of the most popular mutual funds went belly-up, IGVSI components and closed end income funds + other income securities again proved to be a viable growth and income formula, as they pushed MCIM (Market Cycle Investment Management) portfolios to new highs while nearly everything else was pummeled.
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Beginning to see a pattern here? What’s in your wallet?

Study this chart of the past seven years (www.sancoservices.com/MCIMvsSP500.xls). Then insert the three major meltdown scenarios (and recoveries) sketched above. All three were different, but the safest path through them was the same.

Today, we have thousands of, MPT-spawned, derivative speculation machines, creating equity valuations that are just plain ludicrous in the face of all that is wrong with the economic environment. There are similarities to both the 1987 “crash” and to the “dot com bubble”… it’s just a matter of time, and too few of you (and your 401ks) are prepared for the inevitable.

It’s time to take your profits and run… run as fast as you possibly can… to a safer and historically proven, long term focused, working capital growth and income production machine.

Just ask the “investment shadow”, or your advisor, to help you find it.

Stock Market Metrics

Stock Market Metrics: Playing the Numbers
There are no infallible guides to stock market
movements. However, that doesn’t stop
investors from using various measurements to
try to divine the current and future direction of a
stock’s price or the equity markets as a whole.
Here are some common methods (or metrics)
for gauging the stock market.
Gauging volatility
The CBOE Volatility Index®, informally referred
to as the VIX® and nicknamed “the fear index,”
measures real-time changes in the prices of a
group of S&P 500 30-day options traded on the
Chicago Board Options Exchange. When
financial markets are stressed, prices of those
options tend to rise as investors try to hedge
any potential negative impact on their portfolios.
The more concerned options traders are about
potential instability, the higher the VIX tends to
go; conversely, when fears subside, the VIX
tends to be lower. How high is high for the VIX?
During the worst of the 2008 financial crisis, it
spiked to 89 at one point. Since then, it has
gradually returned to more normal levels in the
teens and twenties.
Moving averages
A moving average reflects a stock’s average
price or an index’s value over a specified period
of time (for example, the last 50 days). As a
new average for the time period is calculated
each day, the earliest day’s data drops out of
the average. The results are typically depicted
as a line on a chart, which shows the direction
in which that rolling average has been moving.
For example, a stock’s 50-day moving average
(DMA) shows whether the stock’s short-term
price has been moving up or down; a 200 DMA
smooths out shorter-term fluctuations by using
the longer 200-day rolling time period. When a
stock’s price moves above its 50-day or
200-day average–two of the most popular
gauges–technical analysts typically consider it
a bullish signal that the stock or index has
momentum. Conversely, when the price moves
below its moving average, it’s considered a
bearish signal suggesting that any uptrend
could be reversing.
Golden cross/death cross
When the short-term moving average of a stock
or index rises above a longer-term average–for
example, when the 50 DMA moves upward
above its 200 DMA–the situation is referred to
as a “golden cross.” It shows that the stock’s
most recent price action has been increasingly
positive, suggesting that investors have grown
more bullish on the stock. Technical analysts
also look for golden crosses with various stock
indices–the S&P 500 is perhaps the most
popular–to try to gauge the potential future
direction of the equity markets.
The so-called “death cross” is the inverse of a
golden cross. It occurs when the 50 DMA falls
below the 200-day, and is considered a bearish
signal, especially when seen in a broad market
index such as the S&P 500. Such signals may
or may not be valid; there are arguments on
both sides. However, many of the automated
trading systems that are responsible for a large
percentage of all transactions are guided at
least in part by such perceived quantitative
signals. As a result, an index or stock can
experience volatility–either up or down–as it
reaches either of these points.
Fundamental metrics
Other stock market metrics rely on the nuts and
bolts of corporate operations that are reflected
on a company’s balance sheet–so-called
“fundamental data.” Though based on the
operations of individual companies, they also
can be aggregated and averaged to suggest
the state of an overall stock market index
comprised of those stocks. The following
represent some frequently used fundamental
stock metrics.
Earnings per share (EPS): This represents the
total amount earned on behalf of each share of
a company’s common stock (not all of which is
necessarily distributed to stockholders). It is
calculated by dividing the total earnings
available to common stockholders by the
number of shares outstanding.
Price-earnings (P/E) ratio: This represents the
amount investors are willing to pay for each
dollar of a company’s earnings. Calculated by
dividing the share price by the EPS, it can be
used to gauge investor confidence in the
company’s future. A ratio based on projected
earnings for the next 12 months is a forward
P/E; one based on the previous 12 months’
earnings is a trailing P/E. Like EPS, P/E is
considered an indicator of how expensive or
cheap a stock is.
Return on equity (ROE): This is a way to gauge
how efficient a company is, especially when
compared to its peers in the industry. This
percentage compares a company’s net income
(usually for the last four quarters) to the total
amount of shareholders’ equity (typically, the
difference between a company’s total assets
and its total liability).
Debt/equity ratio: Obtained by dividing a
company’s total liability by all shareholder
equity, this percentage suggests the extent to
which the company relies on borrowing to
finance its growth.