Search Blog
  • Alan Fustey
  • Becky Wong
  • Bert Griffin
  • Blair MacDougall
  • Blake Goldring
  • Brett Baughman
  • Camillo Lento
  • Chris Delaney
  • Cynthia Kett
  • Darren Long
  • Desmond Jordan
  • Don Shaughnessy
  • Doug Lamb
  • Ed Olkovich
  • Eva Sachs
  • Evelyn Jacks
  • Gail Bebee
  • Gerald Trites
  • Gordon Brock
  • Guy Conger
  • Guy Ward
  • Heather Phillips
  • Ian Burns
  • Ian R. Whiting
  • Ian Telfer
  • Jack Comeau
  • James Dean
  • James West
  • Jeffrey Lipton Fairmont Gloucester
  • Jim Ruta
  • Jim Yih
  • Joe White
  • Jonathan Chevreau
  • Kenneth Eng
  • Larry Weltman
  • Malvin Spooner
  • Mark Borkowski
  • Marty Gunderson
  • Michael Kavanagh
  • Monty Loree
  • Nick Papapanos
  • Norma Walton
  • Pat Bolland
  • Patrick O’Meara
  • Paul Brent
  • Peter Deeb
  • Peter Lantos
  • Riaz Mamdani
  • Richard Crenian
  • Richard Warke
  • Rick Atkinson
  • Rob Peers
  • Robert Bird
  • Robert Gignac
  • Sam Albanese
  • Stephane Ruah
  • Steve Nyvik
  • Steve Selengut
  • Tammy Johnston
  • Terry Cutler
  • Trade With Kavan
  • Trevor Parry
  • Trindent Consulting
  • Wayne Wile
  • Categories
    August 2012
    M T W T F S S
    « Jul   Sep »


    Companies guarantee our phones are secure? Really?

    Terry Cutler

    By Terry Cutler

    Just how fast is technology moving? At lightening speed say security specialists, and when it comes to online security it’s moving too fast. We cannot keep up. The example is our growing use of mobile devices. In today’s world of business the Smartphone is fast becoming the gateway to sales and customer communication and operations. These mobile devices also double as the tool for personal banking, social media and emails.

    According to several reports

    There are now 5.9 billion mobile-phone subscribers across the world. Returning to the Ponemon Institute study

    I referred to in my last blog six out of every 10 cyber-security breaches can be linked to our mobile devices. Mobile device intrusions have increased by 155 percent. The speed, at which mobile breaches are occurring, according to the study, has increased to 3,325 percent over a seven-month period in 2011.

    How does one control how corporate Smartphones are used?  Let’s start with knowing what applications are being installed and operated by the users?

    But our phones are secure, right?

    Why would such reputable companies develop and mass-market unsafe products? The product itself may be somewhat safe, but using the apps and other device products that are for sale are out of the control of the main manufacturer.

    The Android Market, BlackBerry App World and Apple, reputable as three leading and business companies, are all present themselves as safe, but outside products, or third party products, may have malware that could wreak havoc on a Smartphone.

    Consider that almost one third of the applications available from the Android Market or Apple App Store require access to user’s location data, according to App Genome Project, to help keep mobile phone users secure.

    Briefly, the App Genome Project (AGP) is an ongoing project that has scanned nearly 300,000 free applications, and mapped out nearly 100,000 applications available in both Android Market and the App Store.

    The list of apps available seems endless. The project reported that the number of apps available on the Android Market increased by a whopping 127 percent since August 2010, while the Apple App Store grew at a rate of 44 percent. It is interesting to note the numbers for one reason; If the growth rate continues at the same pace, the Android Market will have more apps than the Apple App Store by Christmas of 2012, the project estimates.

    Next Week,  “Mr. CEO you’ve been hacked! Now What?”

    The MONEY® Network