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    July 2013
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    Credit card fees – revisted

    Ian Whiting

    I think it is reasonable to assume that most Canadians are now aware that the Competition Tribunal tossed a complaint about the excessive fees being charged by credit card issuers (mainly our big banks) and the impact of those fees on small business and consumers. Even more interesting is the fact that the reasons for the decision to dismiss the complaint are being withheld from the public! I wonder what the Tribunal is trying to hide? Is that “independent” Tribunal really in place to protect consumers and small businesses or rather large financial institutions?

    As I commented in earlier blogs, nothing in life is free – including the use of credit and the accumulation of “rewards points” or other forms of loyalty incentives. Everything has a cost, and despite what some governments and tribunals claim to the contrary, there is only one payor of these fees and that is you and I – the ultimate consumer of everything produced in our economy.

    Somehow, these large institutions (that make somewhere between 5 and 7 BILLION $ per year from Canadians paying these fees) managed to convince the Tribunal that this was in the “best interest” of Canada and Canadian consumers! It must have been very creative and ultimately persuasive and maybe that is why the Tribunal doesn’t want to release all documentation to us. Good heavens, we might even be able to draw our own conclusions that we are being ripped-off and no-one is prepared to take a stand.

    I am not a fan of government intervention, but the voluntary code introduced some months back by the Federal Government, hasn’t done anything and maybe the code should become law.

    The MONEY® Network