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Fact Checked: Amy Tokic

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Updated: January 03, 2024

We adhere to strict standards of editorial integrity to help you make decisions with confidence. Please be aware that some (or all) products and services linked in this article are from our sponsors.

We adhere to strict standards of editorial integrity to help you make decisions with confidence. Please be aware this post may contain links to products from our partners. We may receive a commission for products or services you sign up for through partner links.

Quick overview

What we have here is what you may refer to as the Cadillac of travel credit cards. You’ll feel like a million bucks wherever you take it – it’s packed full of features like six free complimentary airport lounge visits, a $200 travel voucher and two NEXUS application fee rebates. You’ll also earn up to three points for every dollar spent, meaning you can enjoy travel more often with the points you’ll earn. 

However, the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege doesn’t come cheap. At a price of $499 per year and a minimum income of $150,000 (or $200,000 household) – not to mention its high interest rates – means it’s reserved for only the wealthier among us. Just like a classic Cadillac. Read on for a full CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege card review to find out if this premium card is worth a spot in your wallet.

Who’s this card for?

We won’t beat around the bush with this one: the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege card is for the wealthy traveller. Those who like to travel often and in style, skipping pesky airport security lines via NEXUS, sipping mimosas in airport lounges and spending enough each year to earn the necessary points to offset the high $499 fee. If this sounds like you, read on. If not, you might want to check out a card that’s more suited to your lifestyle.

Pros and cons

Pros

Pros

  • A welcome bonus of up to 80,000 points

  • Up to three points per dollar spent (two points for the most popular spending categories, though)

  • Six complimentary visits at over 1,200 lounges per year through the Visa Airport Companion Program

  • $200 annual travel credit

  • Two NEXUS application fee rebates

  • Robust travel insurance, including emergency medical, trip cancellation, flight and baggage delay, auto rental collision and loss and more

Cons

Cons

  • Only available to those who make $150,000 per year as an individual or $200,000 as a household

  • High interest rates: 20.99% for purchases and 22.99% for cash advances (21.99% for Quebec residents)

  • High fee of $499 per year

  • Despite this being a luxury travel card, you’ll have to pay foreign exchange fees

  • Have to spend $6,000 on the card within the first four months to unlock the maximum welcome bonus

Welcome bonus

  • Earn up to 80,000 Aventura points in the first year. Here’s how it works:
  • Earn 25,000 Aventura Points when you spend $3,000 or more in the first four monthly statement periods
  • Earn 25,000 Aventura Points when you spend $6,000 or more in the first four monthly statement periods
  • Earn 30,000 Aventura Points as an anniversary bonus, paid within eight weeks after the one year anniversary of opening the Aventura Infinite Privilege card
  • Six complimentary visits at 1,200+ lounges globally through Visa Airport Companion Program
  • $200 annual Travel Credit
  • 2 NEXUS application fee rebates

How to earn points

The good news is that, right off the bat, you’ll earn a tonne of points with this card via its generous welcome bonus (up to 80,000 Aventura points). The not-so-good news is that the best way to earn everyday points, outside that bonus, is in a category that’s typically only used by the world’s most well-travelled. However, that’s who this card is really geared toward. Here’s how the points break down.

You’ll earn three points for every $1 spent on travel purchased through the CIBC Rewards Centre. So, if you’re a jet setter who spends a lot on travel (and you don’t mind doing all your bookings through CIBC’s website), you can take advantage of the card’s highest point earning category. Outside of that, you’ll still earn two points for every $1 spent on eligible dining, entertainment, transportation, gas, electric vehicle charging and groceries. The points earned for electric vehicle charging is a unique feature here, which might sway those with an EV to choose this card over a similar alternative.

Finally, you’ll earn 1.25 points for every dollar spent on all other purchases. 

How to redeem points

While this CIBC Aventura VIP card is tailored to the world traveller, its point redemption system actually caters to a wide range of Canadians who might prioritize spending on things outside travel.

Of course, you can book personalized travel with your points, including flights, hotels, tours and vacation packages through the CIBC Rewards Centre. You can also use points to purchase merchandise and gift cards, use them toward existing purchases with Shopping with Points, and Pay with Points to use them to pay down your card balance. 

Another great feature is Financial Products with Points, which allows you to use your points to help you reach your financial goals. With this feature, you can make a mortgage prepayment, make a TFSA or RRSP payment to a CIBC account, make payments toward CIBC lines of credit or personal loans and make contributions to a CIBC Investor’s Edge brokerage account. 

How to redeem points is fairly straight-forward, regardless of what you want to put your points toward. Shopping with Points or booking travel with points can be done either through CIBC Online Banking or CIBC Mobile Banking; Paying with Points and Financial Products with Points can be redeemed through CIBC Online Banking. 

Key benefits

  • Up to 80,000 bonus Aventura points in the first year
  • Two points earned per $1 spent in popular spending categories, like dining, entertainment, gas and transportation, elective vehicle charging and groceries
  • Robust travel perks, including lounge access, exclusive bookings, NEXUS rebates and a yearly travel voucher

Insurance coverage

  • Out-of-province emergency travel medical insurance: Up to $5,000,000 per insured person per trip. 31-day coverage period for those 64 and under; 10-day coverage for those 65 and older
  • Trip cancellation: Up to $2,500 per insured person per trip, up to a maximum of $10,000 for all travellers
  • Trip interruption and delay: Up to $5,000 per insured person per trip, to a maximum combined of $25,000 per trip
  • Car rental collision/loss damage insurance: Covers vehicles with an MSRP up to $85,000 for a rental period of 48 days
  • Common carrier accident insurance: Up to $500,000 per insured person
  • Flight delay insurance: Up to $500 per insured person (maximum of $1,000 for all insureds per occurrence)
  • Delay of checked baggage: Up to $500 per insured person (maximum of $1,000 for all insureds per occurrence)
  • Lost or stolen baggage: Up to $1,000 per insured person (maximum of $2,500 for all insureds per occurrence)
  • Purchase security and extended protection: Up to 180 days from date of purchase for purchase security and up to two additional years following expiry of manufacturer warranty for extended protection
  • Mobile device insurance: Up to $1,500 per occurrence, per insured person
  • Hotel burglary insurance: Up to $2,500 combined per occurrence for all insureds

Extra benefits

  • Save up to 25% off auto rentals at Avis and Budget locations worldwide
  • The account comes with a metal card, which reflects its premium perks
  • Save up to 10 cents per litre of gas at Pioneer, Fas Gas, Ultramar and Chevron stations when you link your card to Journie Rewards
  • Access to exclusive business class bookings
  • Dedicated taxi and limo services
  • Exclusive dining and wine experiences

What people have to say about this card

Reddit users point to its travel insurance as a great feature for those who want peace of mind while visiting other countries, as well as the travel perks, which include access to business class bookings and dedicated taxi and limo services. 

Others claim the card is worth it, noting the great benefits and point accumulation. The NEXUS rebate is another feature mentioned. The yearly travel credit is also popular, with one Reddit user explaining that it can be used for anything travel-related, such as flights, hotels and car rentals. 

However, another Reddit user had an issue booking travel with the rewards centre, claiming it takes two to four days to receive an email reply and two to three hours on hold to speak to a representative. This example suggests it’s a good idea to plan ahead when using rewards.

How the card compares

CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege Vs. Scotiabank Platinum American Express

Both are premium travel cards targeted at the bougie traveller. Both offer generous welcome bonuses (80,000 Aventura points with the Visa Infinite Privilege and 60,000 Scene+ points with the Scotiabank Platinum American Express) and include travel perks like lounge access and luxury travel privileges. Where the Amex shines is with its lower fee ($399 per year vs. $499), its lower interest rates (9.99% for both purchases and cash advances vs 20.99% and 21.99% respectively with the Aventura card), and no foreign exchange fees. The Scotia Amex also comes with 10 complimentary airport lounge passes compared to CIBC’s six.  

CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege Vs. American Express The Platinum

The American Express Platinum card may just be the OG VIP travel card, having been the top choice for luxury travellers for decades. It may have to move aside for the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege card as the go-to choice for modern-day travellers, though. For starters, the Amex Platinum isn’t cheap, costing $799 per year. It also costs more for each additional card ($250 vs. CIBC Aventura’s $99). The Amex offers two points per dollar spent on dining, food delivery and travel, and one point on everything else. The CIBC card offers three points for every dollar spent on travel, two points for every dollar spent on dining, entertainment, transportation, gas, electric vehicle charging and groceries, and 1.5 points on everything else. This gives the CIBC card another edge. The one area the Platinum Card has an advantage is with its signup bonus, offering up to 100,000 bonus points vs. 80,000 with the CIBC card. 

CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege Vs. TD Aeroplan Visa Infinite Privilege

It’s the battle of the Visa Infinite Privilege cards. They both have similar interest rates, offer NEXUS rebates, robust travel insurance and complimentary airport lounge visits. The TD Aeroplan Visa Infinite Privilege costs more at $599 per year but does have a more enticing welcome bonus, offering 100,000 Aeroplan points. The one you choose may come down to which point program you prefer. However, you should note that in terms of point accumulation, the CIBC Aventura has the advantage, giving users three points for every dollar spent on travel, two points for every dollar spent on dining, entertainment, transportation, gas, electric vehicle charging, and groceries, and 1.5 points on everything else. The Aeroplan card, meanwhile, will give you two points for every $1 spent with Air Canada, including flights and vacations, 1.5 points on gas, groceries, travel and dining and 1.25 points on all other purchases. 

CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege Vs. CIBC Dividend Visa Infinite

We know all about the Visa Infinite Privilege card, so let’s dig into the CIBC Dividend Visa Infinite. One advantage it has is that you’ll get a rebate for the first year. After that, it’ll cost a lot less than the CIBC card at just $120 per year, compared to $499. The Dividend Visa also offers higher cash back rates at 4% for gas, electric vehicle charging and groceries; 2% cash back on transportation, dining and recurring payments; and 1% cash back on everything else. The Dividend Visa is also more accessible, requiring just $60,000 income or $100,000 household income vs. the required $150,000 or $200,000 to qualify for the Visa Infinite Privilege. They’re also different cards aimed at different users; the Visa Infinite Privilege is meant for travellers, while the Dividend Visa Infinite is targeted to those who want to earn cash back on purchases. 

Is the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite worth it?

If you’re wondering if the CIBC Visa Infinite card is worth it, it’s really up to you. If you travel a lot and like to do so in style, having access to six complimentary lounge visits, a NEXUS rebate, and three points for every dollar spent on travel through the CIBC rewards centre might make up for the high cost of the card. The additional 80,000 bonus points will likely offset the cost of the card as well. And maybe you just want a swanky metal card and, to you, that makes it worth it. Keep in mind that if you don’t have a household income of $200,000 or a personal income of $150,000, you’ll have to look at alternatives. 

FAQs

  • Does the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege card come with lounge access?

    +

    Yes, it does! Not only does it give you access to the Visa Airport Companion Program, it also comes with six complimentary visits per year.

  • What’s the minimum income required for the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege?

    +

    You’ll need to make either $150,000 per year as an individual or $200,000 per year as a household to qualify for the card.

  • Is the CIBC Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege made of metal?

    +

    One luxury feature of the card is that it’s a metal card, which gives it an ultra premium feel.

About our author

Justin da Rosa
Justin da Rosa, Freelance Writer

Justin is a writer and editor who has been covering personal finance for over 10 years. He's written for companies such as KOHO, Ratehub, BMO, Zoocasa, and Questrade, among others. Justin also created a course in Content Creation, which he taught at York University for four years. When not writing, Justin can be found at a live concert, on the golf course, riding a motorcycle, or sailing.

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